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3D – The Key to Tobii’s Performance Lead October 17, 2016

Posted by Scott Hodgins in eye tracking, Glasses, Market Research, Marketing, Media, neuromarketing, Shopper Research, Technology, Tips And Tricks, Tobii, Updates, Usability & UX.
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This post is trying to answer some of the most common questions that we get asked – Why should I buy a Tobii? Why is it better? System “X” has a “better head box” and system “Y” is cheaper.

The answer from our point of view is simple, the eyetracking is more accurate than using other systems for more people over a longer timeframe.

This is a pretty grand claim, why are we so confident?

Let’s start at the beginning; Eyetracking itself is straight forward, there are several well documented methods to find and follow the pupil, Tobii uses a non-intrusive video based technique called “Pupil Centre Corneal Reflection” (PCCR). Essentially an IR illuminator is used to help differentiate between the pupil and the iris, it also creates a highlight or glint that we use as well. The Tobii systems use an improved version of this idea, the secret-sauce as it were being a combination of two things, illumination and data modelling. These two areas allow the remote and wearable trackers to monitor the respondents relative 3D position in space, adjust the calibration parameters in the 3D physiological model, and therefore afford a far greater range of movement than similar systems while keeping accuracy and precision.
(Figure below shows the native 3D data from the TG2)

3d-head-coord-tobii

Illumination: Tobii can use up to two different lighting techniques known as bright and dark pupil to optimise the illumination for the participant in that location, and crucially when they move we can adapt the illumination to keep track of them. This allows a Tobii to offer people greater freedom of movement while retaining the tracking accuracy without the need for constant drift correction from the system operator.

Data modelling: The Tobii method is different having typically used multiple cameras in their research grade eyetrackers and have done since the launch of the T and X series systems in 2007/8. The advantage of using multiple cameras is that we can physically describe the location of the eye in space. That is to say we know with a very high degree of accuracy where the centre of your eye is, and which eye it is, for every sample recorded. The slightly different images from the pair of cameras in an X2 for example allows the creation of a 3D physiological model of the eyes it is tracking during calibration. This approach allows Tobii to understand the movement of the eye or the eyetracker should one or the other move and adjust the calibration accordingly with a high degree of precision.

The net result is that the these systems can accommodate movement, even if the head leaves the area trackable by the hardware and can recover tracking when the eyes are visible again, this is one of the reasons people keep choosing Tobii for demanding applications like infant research and in-vivo commercial research. In a recent study Acuity Intelligence recruited 330 people as they were entering supermarkets and didn’t have to turn away a single participant because they could not be tracked – a first for any data collection exercise with this number of people regardless of the brand of technology they were using.

Don’t just take out word for it, please challenge us, whether it is onscreen, in the real world or in the emerging AR and VR application areas we can help.

 

Just What the Optician Ordered? November 25, 2015

Posted by Jon Ward in eye tracking, Glasses, Market Research, Shopper Research, Tobii.
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It’s been a busy week in Sweden it seems as hot on the heels of the announcement of the amazing new 100hz speed option for the Tobii Glasses 2 system two new accessories have also been announced.

First up is the Precription Lens pack. The Prescription Lenses package contains corrective snap-on lenses for Pro Glasses 2 to facilitate studies involving subjects with either short or long sightedness. From mobile device testing and operator assessments, to sports research and wayfinding studies, these lenses will allow you to include a larger variety of subjects in your research.

The lenses range from -5 to +3 diopter in 0.5 diopter steps in order to provide support for a larger cross-section of the population with vision impairments. Separate lenses are provided for left and right eyes so you can accommodate differences between your subjects’ eyes.

Lens replacement is quick and easy with a magnetic frame that provides an easy-to-use, snap-on interface. At the same time, the solution is attached securely enough for test situations that involve a lot of natural movement, such as in sports research scenarios. Specific lens requirements and replacements are also available and the kit is supplied in a travel case.

 

Tobii Glasses 2 Prescription Lens Kit

 

Second is the new carry case and extended battery set. Combining a soft pouch with shoulder strap to carry the recording assistant and an external battery that neatly slots into its own holder on the bag the unit allows users to carry the recording unit in comfort and adding extra convenience for field based research with extended times between battery changes.

The case allows even quicker set-up and ease of use for the participant and researcher – and looks pretty good as well!

TG2 Pouch and Battery TG2 Pouch

Both accessories are available to order now – contact Acuity for more details.

Tobii Glasses 2 Real World Mapping – Saving Time in the Real World! October 29, 2015

Posted by Jon Ward in eye tracking, Glasses, Market Research, Marketing, Media, Shopper Research, Technology, Tobii, Updates, Usability & UX.
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The Tobii Glasses 2 have been a huge success, with the wide angled field of view, live wireless viewing and automatic slippage compensation thanks to the unique 4 camera binocular tracking more and more people are able to do some great fieldwork both unassisted and in a more traditional context. However as with all glasses based eye tracking platforms the analysis of the data is more time-consuming than with a screen based system as you need to code the user data onto reference images to create aggregated visual outputs and statistical metrics. This can be very time-consuming and depending on the type of interactions mapped (fixation or raw data) combined with the environment and task of the user (unboxing a product, retail purchases, driving and so on) can take anywhere from 10 to 20 times the duration of the recording to code – so 100 minutes of total recorded interactions could take upwards of 16 hours to code before you can begin the analysis.

Real World Mapping Example

Tobii Real World Mapping can help reduce this time considerably in many types of study by using advanced computer vision to automatically detect the gaze points based on the reference images you upload – meaning that 10x or 20x multiplier comes down to as little as 2-5x, and processing can be queued so the software can happily run along in the background freeing up valuable staff resources to focus on other tasks.Once the automatic process is completed you are presented with a chart plotting the automatically mapped points, alongside a confidence level in its accuracy and then any missed points (for example if there was a large amount of occlusion in the frame) or mapped points that need some adjustment can be manually corrected by a researcher.

Real World Mapping Example 2

This video has a brief overview of this exciting feature which will be part of next update of the Tobii Glasses Analyzer software.

Real World Mapping from Tobii

Of course not every single study will be able to take advantage of the new functionality, for example very dynamic content such as sports science studies have few or no fixed reference points to work with, objects that are largely occluded constantly or are at extreme distances will not be viable but for a large number of shopper studies, product interaction, mobile and tablet applications, advertising and navigation tasks users should see a significant time savings to using the tool – and by running a pilot (see tip 28 on Tim’s Acuity Intelligence blog for a reminder of the importance of this : http://www.acuity-intelligence.com/blog/eye-tracking-tips-26-30) you can quantify this benefit and also ensure that your reference images are correct and work well – more about that another time!

The Real World Mapping is ready to demonstrate to customers now – so get in touch and we will be happy to walk you through it, and show how it can help you process your glasses based eye tracking data quicker!